Born on July 18, 1918, Nelson Mandela’s birthday is now recognized by the United Nations as Mandela Day.

Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world - Nelson Mandela

These journalism pieces from this year and last discuss and celebrate Mandela’s work and influence:

“As we celebrate his birthday, we remember that he fought for us in the struggle. The struggle was to fight apartheid,” said 12-year-old Kgaugelo Masunhloane at Batsogile primary school in Soweto.

In 2009, the United Nations agreed to commemorate Mandela’s birthday every year to recognise the Nobel Peace Prize laureate’s contribution to resolving conflicts and promoting race relations, human rights and reconciliation.

People all over the world were enouraged to devote 67 minutes of their day to public service, to honour Mandela’s 67 years in politics.

As he approaches the age of 93 [Mandela is now 94], Nelson Mandela is still kicking, inspiring an international day of community service on July 18, his birthday.  … Barring some major disaster at the same time, Mandela’s death may receive more visibility than the achievements of his long life.

The question is: Which Mandela will be memorialised? Will it be the leader who built a movement and a military organisation to fight injustice, or a man of inspiration with a great smile who we admire because of the many years he suffered behind bars?

How do you see and understand Nelson Mandela’s living legacy?